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In adults, what is the association between intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and body weight? (DGAC 2010)

Conclusion

A moderate body of epidemiologic evidence suggests that greater consumption of sugars that add calories. These beverages include, but are not limited to soda, fruit ades, and sports drinks. Also called calorically-sweetened beverages." class="Glossary">sugar-sweetened beverage is associated with increased body weight in adults.

A moderate body of evidence suggests that under isocaloric controlled conditions, sugars, syrups, and other caloric sweeteners that are added to foods during processing, preparation, or consumed separately. Added sugars do not include naturally occurring sugars such as those in milk or fruits. Names for added sugars include: brown sugar, corn sweetener, corn syrup, dextrose, fructose, fruit juice concentrates, glucose, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, invert sugar, lactose, maltose, malt syrup, molasses, raw sugar, turbinado sugar, trebalose and sucrose." class="Glossary">added sugar, including sugar-sweetened beverages, are no more likely to cause weight gain than any other source of energy.

Grade

Moderate
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Evidence Summaries

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In adults, what is the association between intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and body weight?


Search Plan and Results

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SSB: In adults, what are the associations between intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and energy intake and body weight?